4 Things Your Home Inspector May Miss

home inspecting
          The Home Inspection

I like home inspectors, they do a nice job for my seller and buyer clients, and the reports they generate point out items to watch out for and may cost money to fix. According to a Realtor.com article, home inspectors have checklists that contain more than 1,600 features to evaluate. But some items require a specialist for a more thorough evaluation:

The Fireplace and Chimney

Inspectors often open and shut dampers to make sure they’re working properly. They may shine a flashlight up the chimney to look for any obstructions. But for anything further, buyers likely will need to hire a fireplace inspector to look for things like soot and creosote buildup, which are possible fire-starters. Those extra inspections could cost anywhere from $80 to $200.

Foundation Issues

A geotechnical or structural engineer may need to be brought in if a buyer has concerns about the ground underneath the home, such as whether any shifting, tilting, or sinkholes have caused damage. Professionals will test the soil for several potential problems. Basic testing likely will cost between $300 and $1,000, while more invasive testing can cost upwards of $5,000. Buyers on a budget might consult a free site called PlotScan, which reveals any history of sinkholes and other natural catastrophes in the vicinity of the home, to better understand whether they need further inspection help.

Well and Septic Systems

Although our area does not have many wells or septic systems, this can be an issue for some home buyers. Some home inspectors trained to evaluate septic systems may be willing to do an extra inspection for an added fee to test a home’s well water and septic system. Otherwise, buyers will have to hire a well inspector. These professionals will collect water samples to test in a lab for coliform, arsenic, and other harmful bacteria and chemicals. They’ll also make sure that seals, vents, and screens have been properly maintained and that the well and pump are producing enough water. That typically will cost about $250 for an inspection.

Roof

“We’ll go up on roofs if it’s safe,” says Frank Lesh, executive director of the American Society of Home Inspectors. “But if it’s raining or it’s too high, we’re not able to get to it.” A specialized roof inspection, which costs about $500 to $750, offers a closer look. Some roof inspectors will even do an initial consultation for free. Those who don’t go on the roof can sometimes conduct an infrared inspection to look for any temperature differences along the roof to see where heat or air conditioning might be escaping.

The Lesson: if you believe you need a better inspection in these 4 area, you are advised to take a better look through a specialist. Let me know if you are interested in buying or selling real estate and if you would like to know what to look for in a home inspection report.  650 483-4932.

Author: rafaelcastrojr@gmail.com

Whether you are a first time Buyer or first time Seller, I will put my over 25 years in the real estate field to work to get you the best value for your dollar. After all, real estate can create great wealth for you and your family. Doesn’t it deserve your attention?